The Masonic Conspiracy (DVD): investigating Freemasonry - exclusively from The Insider



The Israelis who were warned hours before 9/11



*** The leading Israeli newspaper, Haaretz, confirmed today that at least two employees at the Israeli-based telecoms company, Odigo, knew what was about to happen two hours before the the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre were attacked on 11 September 2001.
    The warning was immediately passed on directly to Israeli and American security services. This all happened before the attacks took place, yet the intelligence services and the military have claimed that they were not prepared. ***

Odigo, the instant messaging service, says that two of its workers received messages two hours before the Twin Towers attack on September 11 predicting the attack would happen, and the company has been cooperating with Israeli and American law enforcement, including the FBI, in trying to find the original sender of the message predicting the attack.

Micha Macover, CEO of the company, said the two workers received the messages and immediately after the terror attack informed the company's management, which immediately contacted the Israeli security services, which brought in the FBI.

"I have no idea why the message was sent to these two workers, who don't know the sender. It may just have been someone who was joking and turned out they accidentally got it right. And I don't know if our information was useful in any of the arrests the FBI has made," said Macover. Odigo is a U.S.-based company whose headquarters are in New York, with offices in Herzliya.

As an instant messaging service, Odigo users are not limited to sending messages only to people on their "buddy" list, as is the case with ICQ, the other well-known Israeli instant messaging application.

Odigo usually zealously protects the privacy of its registered users, said Macover, but in this case the company took the initiative to provide the law enforcement services with the originating Internet Presence address of the message, so the FBI could track down the Internet Service Provider, and the actual sender of the original message.

SOURCE: Haaretz (IL), "Odigo says workers were warned of attack", 16 July 2004.
[ http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=77744 ]


FURTHER READING

Washington Post, "Instant Messages To Israel Warned Of WTC Attack", 28 September 2001.
    OFFICIALS at instant-messaging firm Odigo confirmed today that two employees received text messages warning of an attack on the World Trade Center two hours before terrorists crashed planes into the New York landmarks. Citing a pending investigation by law enforcement, the company declined to reveal the exact contents of the message or to identify the sender.
    But Alex Diamandis, vice president of sales and marketing, confirmed that workers in Odigo's research and development and international sales office in Israel received a warning from another Odigo user approximately two hours prior to the first attack. Diamandis said the sender of the instant message was not personally known to the Odigo employees. Even though the company usually protects the privacy of users, the employees recorded the Internet protocol address of the message's sender to facilitate his or her identification.
    Soon after the terrorist attacks on New York, the Odigo employees notified their management, who contacted Israeli security services. In turn, the FBI was informed of the instant message warning. FBI officials were not immediately available for comment today. The Odigo service includes a feature called People Finder that allows users to seek out and contact others based on certain interests or demographics. Diamandis said it was possible that the attack warning was broadcast to other Odigo members, but the company has not received reports of other recipients of the message.
    In addition to operating its own messaging service network, Odigo has licensed its technology to over 100 service providers, portals, wireless carriers, and corporations, according to the company.

"The Insider" mailing list article, 16 July 2004.

SEND THIS INFORMATION TO A FRIEND:
From (your email):   
To: (their email): 

Tags: 9/11, prior, warning, messages, Odigo, Israeli, company, 11, September, 2001, Israel, were, warned, , conspiracy theories.

 
Copyright 2014 The Insider.

This service is provided on our standard Terms and Conditions. Please read our Privacy Policy. To inquire about advertising and sponsorship or permission to reproduce material from The Insider, please contact us.